CRISIS AND CONNECTEDNESS

With  Compassion

If we can see ourselves connected, yet ignorant of most of the connections,                                   then we have little choice but to be compassionate. Donald Michael

Today we are in a crisis; I think that is agreed. Today we are connected and need compassion. I don’t know if that isnderstood. Connectedness requires open-mindedness and open- heartedness. It takes a whole connected village to raise a child and to solve a crisis. It takes compassion, open-mindedness, open-heartedness and togetherness.

Connectedness, open-mindedness and open-heartedness is a new symbol of competence today.  What this country needs most now is connectedness. None of us is a smart as all of us, Kenneth H. Blanchard. And none of us is as compassionate as all of us. Can you imagine a US village where all of us are connected and compassionate?

Compassion of course involves a sensitivity to self, to others and the environment. Doesn’t this sound like open-heartedness? One of the most powerful lessons of chaos theory was the concept that everything is interconnected to everything else in an unbroken wholeness. It is the notion of total connected, everythingelse, and unbroken wholeness that is powerful — and seemingly incomprehensible. Accepting it is one thing, understanding it is another, and applying it is something else. We are all connected, but we don’t understand most connections.

Today’s crisis helps explain to us our interconnections. We are asked to keep our connections six feet apart in order to solve our crisis. This does not eliminate connectedness. What is happening to you is happening to everyone else. Being forced to modify our connections reminds of us of how connected we really are. This is where compassion is helpful. We need to do unto others what they need to do unto us, in order to save all of us. Open-heartedness will serve us well.

Without an open mind there is no creativity and without an open heart there is no compassion. Compassion is needed when we don’t know all the interconnections to other humans. Creativity is needed when we don’t know all the interconnections of everything else. Creativity suggests open-mindedness and compassion suggests open-heartedness. Compassion excludes the possibility of being exclusive, unconnected.

Today’s crisis presents us with the reality of “everything is interconnected to everything else in an unbroken wholeness”. This unbroken wholeness is called community; it is the definition of the whole village. It takes compassionate interconnectedness of the whole village to resolve  this crisis.

The whole idea of compassion is based on a keen awareness                                                           of the interdependence of all these living beings, which are                                                                 all part of one another, and all involved in one another.

                                                 Thomas Merton

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4 Responses to CRISIS AND CONNECTEDNESS

  1. EUGENE UNGER says:

    Hb my life long friend, well said and a credit to their writers. However something is missing. Love! When Jesus was asked by a young lawyer “ So, what’s the bottom line on how to live?” Jesus said “ Love the Lord God with all your heart, soul, strength, and mind. And love your neighbors as you love yourself ! Love our creator and our neighbors and ourselves. What would the world look like if we took the advice of Jesus? Love gene Sent from my iPhone

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  2. EUGENE UNGER says:

    Miss our time together. Who knows how much we will have? Unconnected presently , but loved. Gene Sent from my iPhone!

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  3. Marianne Fontana says:

    There seem to be good things coming from this difficult time as more people are helping one another. Maybe we will all begin to understand what interconnectedness is. This is a really good blog. Thanks

  4. So jung says:

    i am so happy to visit and read your article.
    Very interesting and impressive.

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