PERCEPTION “WIGGLE ROOM”

Room For Error

Perceptions are portraits not photographs. Daniel Gilbert

Personal perception, the way a person sees things, may not be the way things are or the way others see things. Kathryn Schulz, in one of my favorite books, Being Wrong, makes this point about perception. She says the major reason we can get things wrong is that our perception of reality is always our interpretation of reality; this implies wiggle room.

I realize that this wiggle room is what I have been writing about for years. What one observes (perception) is always subjective (a mental interpretation). Believing is seeing. Whenever there is belief there is interpretation and room for error. The reason the wiggle room of perception is important is that the way we see things determines the way we do things. Beliefs become behavior.

Although I write about this wiggle room, I am not sure I have personally conquered it, although I think I know how. To downsize this wiggle room and reduce my chance of error, first requires me to acknowledge it. This I believe I have done. Then I need to expand the way I see things (my subjective perception). To do so, I need to ask myself and a trusted friend:

What am I not seeing?

            What am I not paying attention to?

            Is my interpretation biased, accurate?

            How is my memory, or lack of it, interfering?

            What does my behavior (the way I do things) tell me about my perception

              (the way I see things)?

 I am not sure how often I ask myself these questions. And I don’t often ask a trusted companion for feedback, although sometimes I get it without asking. Do you acknowledge the possible existence of wiggle room in your perception? Have you ever asked yourself these questions or asked for feed back?

Much of what we take to be perceptions are actually conceptions, mental and not empirical.  Ken Wilber

 

 

 

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5 Responses to PERCEPTION “WIGGLE ROOM”

  1. I see the picture of a tall man dressed in all black about to behead an American citizen. What are the assumptions he is holding? How could his beliefs be changed? How did he acquire these beliefs? What, if anything, could we Americans do to modify his beliefs? Those are the questions that puzzle me. John

  2. Eugene Unger says:

    Perception is reality. Then. Adjustments of reality as you know it

    Gene

    >

  3. Eugene Unger says:

    Good stuff!

    Gene

    >

  4. Marianne says:

    Your message keeps showing up by different authors. Wiggle room is an interesting way give one an encouragement to look at a belief. A problem with asking a friend for feedback might be that a friend is often one who “sees” things as you do. So another block to seeing reality—-or is there such thing as reality? Oh my! Keep writing 😉

    Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

    Positive Uncertainty wrote:

    > a:hover { color: red; } a { text-decoration: none; color: #0088cc; } a.primaryactionlink:link, a.primaryactionlink:visited { background-color: #2585B2; color: #fff; } a.primaryactionlink:hover, a.primaryactionlink:active { background-color: #11729E !important; color: #fff !important; } /* @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .post { min-width: 700px !important; } } */ WordPress.com hbgelatt posted: “Room For Error Perceptions are portraits not photographs. Daniel Gilbert Personal perception, the way a person sees things, may not be the way things are or the way others see things. Kathryn Schulz, in one of my favorite books, Being Wrong, makes t”

  5. Robert Leon says:

    Partner,

    It seems that no one can “see things as they really are.” Is that true?

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